Sia

Single Review: Sia – ‘The Greatest’ feat Kendrick Lamar

Published On September 18, 2016 | By Daniel Patrin | Music, Singles & EP's

Shimmering again with modern pressured energy tipped with musical integrity both beautiful and physical, SIA’s latest pop wonder has hit the shelves ahead of her impending 2016 Nostalgic For The Present tour.

Sia - The GreatestThe Greatest is a radio and chart-topping mainstay – operating within the use of inferred and organically beautified pop music magic. Co-Written by Sia and Greg Kurstin, the solo artist and recent pop-icon on the scene, grips avidly to this evocative summer anthem. Sia’s winding vocal resonance situates under memorable waves of rhythm evoked drum and bassline symmetries, while catchy triumph themes of power reverberate through the active hook stimulants. Surprisingly, the track features Compton-bred contemporary legend Kendrick Lamar as he slams a few bars coincided with the empowering and reassuring nature of the lyrical themes gripped in the song’s three and a half minutes. “I transform with pressure, I’m hands on wherever. I fell twice before, my bounce back was special” – he raps before Sia’s reassuring lyrical buoyancy exhibits a strength and empowerment as the words “Don’t give up, Don’t give up” soulfully repeat into the song’s eventual fade out.

The track is the result of a clear charged perspective, an interpersonal and charismatic sheen in which Sia holds so boldly close to her music. Messages of positive reinforcement paired with counterpart substantive feelings as described by her fellow contributor, Kendrick, boost this track into the division of logical pop music – lined with the inner workings of self-esteem in mind. A true recipe for the greatest, this has already begun global radio dominance, with sure outcomes of summer exuberance and illimitable vibes.

4 / 5 stars     

About The Author

::: Based in Sydney, Daniel has a large enthusiasm for writing, reading and anything to do with A Tribe Called Quest. Music is a healthy obsession for him, as is Seinfeld, films, and the constant necessity to expand his growing record collection.

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