photo: Live Nation UK

Single Review: Jessie Ware – Selfish Love

Published On September 21, 2017 | By Rachael Scarsbrook | Music, Singles & EP's

The return of Jessie Ware is one to be heralded, September will see her release third album; Glasshouse. Marriage and motherhood take centre stage as themes throughout the record, with the former proving the main focus on second single; Selfish Love.

As Ware seemingly bemoans a selfish lover, the concurrent narrative questions Ware herself for being guilty of the same romantic crimes. Hooked on selfish love, Ware’s voice runs like smooth water over subtle jazz that differentiates her from fellow South London royalty Adele and Florence Welch.

There is such a measured and considered persona presented by Ware in her songs, a light aloofness that is backed up by how she transforms melancholy into heartfelt yet relatable ballads. The accompanying music video sees Ware snare a cheating lover, further cementing the idea that Selfish Love is to her what Babooshka was to Kate Bush.

The only concern with Selfish Love is the lack of oomph in the chorus, Ware has one of the finest voices yet by holding back it almost seems like she is teasing us too much for us to handle. Jessie Ware has spoilt fans with some of the strongest choruses in pop throughout her career, so it’s no surprise that I find myself banging my fist on the desk yelling “BUT WHERE IS THE FIRE JESSIE?”

I’ll step away from the furniture and take in Selfish Love for the divine piece of art that it is. Jessie Ware doesn’t concern herself with life in the spotlight and prefers to let her music do the talking, and my does it serenade everything in the world. There is a grandiose feel that retains Ware’s human touch, and many will selfishly love her return to the spotlight in the coming months.

4 / 5 stars     

About The Author

::: Journalism graduate that can often be found gushing about their puppy or adoring bands who cover themselves in glitter. If I went on Mastermind, my specialist subject would be the life and times of Florence Welch or the history of angry women in bands.

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