Nicole Millar

EP Review: Nicole Millar – Communication

Published On December 6, 2016 | By Michael Smith | Music, Singles & EP's

Nicole Millar may have only just released her debut EP in July this year, but that hasn’t stopped her from keeping the ball rolling. Setting out as a solo artist after collaborating with Peking Duk, she’s proven her worth as a force to be reckoned with—The title track from her first EP Tremble was a viral hit—and only makes that claim even stronger with the follow-up EP, Communication.

Nicole Millar CommunicationStylistically, Communication bears many similarities to Tremble. The same airy, light synthpop sound is used throughout most of the EP, meshing perfectly with her sweet, endearing vocals perfectly. The big difference this time is the increase in clarity and production values that she’s experienced in the past few months. The screeching waver of Signal’s chorus is a highlight on the EP, and the more downtempo tracks—both the melodic electronica of Pixelated and the more general synthpop of One Thing—are some of the most aurally pleasing tracks she’s produced to date. Even the only unfitting track, her collaboration with Sweater Beats and Imad Royal entitled Better, is of such a good quality that its general difference is entirely unimportant, and the consistency of the remainder of the EP, both in terms of quality and style, is amazing.

If you were a fan of what Nicole Millar was offering on her first EP, then Communication is everything you could’ve wanted and more. Mere months after her solo debut, Millar has refined her sound to a degree that makes her vocal and stylistic quality as an artist shine bright. If you haven’t listened to her yet or just never got around to it, Communication is the perfect time to start.

4.5 / 5 stars     

About The Author

::: Michael is a long-time writer of both critical and fictional work, a video game geek and a lifelong appreciator of music. Despite being a fan of all genres of music, the Pop and Electronic genres make up most of his personal library, including music from countries such as France and Japan. He’s spent more money importing albums than most would spend on music in their entire lives!

Comments are closed.