Album Review: Seafret – Tell Me It’s Real

Published On January 20, 2016 | By Jessica Thomas | Albums, Music

It’s a rarity that a name does the job of describing a band’s sound rather than just being an identifier, but Bridlington duo Seafret pull it off effortlessly. Often defined as a soft mist that comes in from the sea, Seafrets debut album Tell Me It’s Real features the musical equivalent, with an abundance of rolling rhythms and breezy chords. Although only their first LP, each track is crafted with a subtle air of sophistication that radiates from the simple chord use, to the intricacy in the lyrics.

Seafret Tell Me Its RealComing into their own with heartfelt melodic croons, Give Me Something, Out Of Nowhere and Overtime each jest with a delicate tune, allowing the distinct vocals to radiate throughout. Which is significantly noted in Breathe, combining delicate plucks and Jack Sedman’s serenading vocals, exclaiming, “I have to breathe, I never held a heart before” / “You’ll always be where I belong”. With the striking feature from singer/songwriter Rosie Carney on duet To The Sea also displaying this beautiful formula. The pair beautifully bounce and blend their vocals against each other, creating an airy dreamscape of a song.

While lead single Wildfire leans Seafret further into belter territory, as the beat pulses behind Sedman’s signature croon throughout the infectious chorus, “we are bound to each other’s hearts, cold, torn, and pulled apart” / “This love is, like wildfire”. With opener Missing, Over and Atlantis invoking a similar power on the record. And of course There’s A Light deserves a mention, with its charismatic swagger and sway worthy chorus, that chants “there’s a light at the end of it all, let it shine” / “Love is my weakness”.

Tell Me It’s Real is an album that’s all too easy to get lost in, with each track invoking as much emotional pull as the last. Although a touch repetitive when played on a loop, each song shines alone, Seafret have certainly figured out their sound.

4 / 5 stars     

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