Photo: Anton Corbijn/Sony Music Australia

Album Review: Depeche Mode – Spirit

Published On March 17, 2017 | By Sonia de Freitas | Albums, Music

In a career that spans four decades, Depeche Mode have built up a powerful and extensive discography. The band is still made up of the founding members; Dave Gahan (vocals), Martin Gore (guitar), Andy Fletcher (keyboard)- an impressive feat in itself- and in 2017 they have released their fourteenth studio album, Spirit. Depeche Mode called in the talents of James Ford who has produced for a host of remarkable artists including; Arctic Monkeys, Foals and Florence & The Machine.

True to their iconic dark electronic aesthetic, Depeche Mode’s full an satisfying soundscapes show the restraint, discipline and craftsmanship of an experienced group, selecting only the essential sonic elements to create their music. Over their career they’ve each delved into turbulent life styles involving debaucherous inclinations and a rather dark outlook, their music reflects this and comes from a place of authenticity. Their music resonates with our conscious as a society and how, in many respects, we’ve seemingly taken two steps backwards. Lamenting in this uncertainty, Spirit captures a sense of burden and need for change.

Depeche Mode’s song writing is just as enticing as ever. The relatable lyrical content of the album has the ability to seamlessly move from commentary on society as in the politically charged first single, Where’s the Revolution, to singing about personal relationships as in Poison Hearts. No matter the macro or micro scale of their subject matter, they prove their art is ever relevant, highlighting our apathy and calling for us to reflect upon ourselves as individuals and a wider community, encouraging change. Each song on this album has been purposefully added, demonstrating the range they are capable of, while at the same time presenting a cohesive work of art.  Spirit proves that Depeche Mode are still an essential creative force that we need in the world.

4.5 / 5 stars     

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